About Ted | Ted McLyman dot Com

About Ted

Quick Overview:

  • Husband, father, grandfather, LT Col USMC (Ret), author, entrepreneur, and triathlete
  • Founder and CEO of Apexx Behavioral Solutions Group
  • Creator of the "Quick Scan" Money Temperament Profile Assessment
  • Field guy with years of experience in the financial services industry 
  • ​Speaker, trainer, and consultant.
  • BA Colgate University, MPA Pepperdine University, and MS Instructional & Performance Technology Boise State University
  • Economics Instructor U.S. Naval Academy, Aide to the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Financial Management, and various command and staff assignments.  
  • Ironman All World Triathlete

"I help people who "Get It" get more..."


My Mission:

I'm on a quest. I want to change business as usual.

I believe we are too focused on products and services and not enough on people.

Here's the dirty little secret,  success in life is about understanding and managing behavior - not money.

I am a founder and CEO of Apexx Behavioral Solutions Group; the author of “Money Makes Me Crazy, A Prescription for Money Sanity,” and the creator of Quick Scan Money Temperament Assessment System™.

More...

I help people, and organizations make better money decisions.

This is my personal blog. Here, I will talk abot my philosophy, lessons learned, and points of view about money, people, and engaging prospects and clients.

I believe the common wisdom about money is wrong. Success with money has little to do with money. It's about knowing your unique money temperament... and building strategies around it.

I also believe that the rules of money have changed. Most products and services are now largely a commodity, very complex, and easy to get wrong. Not technically wrong; but wrong for you because they don't match your unique money temperament.

The business world has changed and we need to talk about it.

Like all complex self-correcting systems, change comes best from the bottom-up. By people who are fed-up with business as usual. 

So join me as we take on the world...​

I typically post 1 or 2 times a week – although life sometimes gets in the way.

I want this to be an interactive blog. I urge you to take part. Join the discussion. Post your comments. Be a guest blogger.

If you are interested in advertising, or have an affiliate product, please contact me.

As I said, I want to change the financial world. Let's get started!


My Biography:

I’ve worked with money and people and people and money my entire life. My perspective has always been from the ground-up – I learned that from the Marine Corps.

​I grew up in a Norman Rockwell community in central New York. I was a good student and a better athlete – football, track, and skiing.

I’ve been married to my high school sweetheart for over 40+ years. We have two adult daughters.

My oldest is married, and lives in Boston. She's a professor of dance and choreography at Salem University – she’s the one with the granddaughter.

My youngest daughter lives in Nashville. She's an artist manager for a major artist management firm – think Brooks & Dunn and Reba.

​I attended Colgate University. It was there that I learned how to think, read, and write - and a few other things I can't talk about here.

I played a little football. The high point was being run over by Dan Marino. And since it snows in Hamilton, NY from about October through April, I spent a great deal of my time teaching skiing.

At the end of my freshman year I joined the Marine Corps’s Platoon Leaders Class (PLC) program.

The Marine Corps required I maintain a 2.0 GPA. I was successful. As a result, I helped push a number of my peers into the top half of the class. Many of them are now lawyers, for that I do apologize.

​I was commissioned as a 2Lt of Marines upon graduation. This is where my education really begain. 

Becoming a Marine Corps officer was undoubtedly the best decision of my life. I got to do some seriously cool John Wayne stuff, travel across the world, and meet some truly remarkable people.

This is where I learned that people are not very good with money. Not only did I make some dubious money choices; I saw first-hand how the way people think and feel about money can impact their lives — both good and bad.

I had no intention of making the Marine Corps at career, but I loved it. So I stayed.

Before I knew it, I was a Lt Col stationed at the Pentagon assigned as the Aide to the Assistant Secretary the Navy for Financial Management – time flies.

My career started during the Vietnam conflict and ended with Desert Storm (talk about experiencing human behavior).

​Apart from doing the normal Marine things; I earned two master’s degrees, built the Marine Corps’ financial management school, taught economics at the US Naval Academy (there I learned that very smart people can have very bad money behavior), did some behavioral research, and decided I wanted to be a financial advisor when I retired.

​In 1995, I became a fully licensed financial advisor and insurance agent with First Command Financial Planning.

I received very traditional sales and product training – sales and phone scripts, closing techniques, and so forth. It turned out I was good at sales.

Within two years, I was one of the top producing advisors in the company. I led the company in financial plans and sales of a particular mutual fund. As a result, I was promoted to management and moved to the “dark side.”

As a manager I became a turnaround specialist. It seems like I was always sent to the lowest producing office and asked to fix it. Again, I prove that I was pretty good at this. In fact, I took one district from last in the company to number 11 in 18 months.

​In 2006, I joined Waddell & Reed is a district manager and built their office in Augusta Georgia.

Everything was going well until about 2008. If you don’t remember, we had a bit of an economic meltdown. It was a time when a lot of very smart, and not so smart, people acted very human with their money – losing trillions in the process.

This was a behavioral meltdown. It seemed that many very smart people were doing very dumb things with money. It became obvious to me that behavior matters - a great deal.

This is when I really started to question how the financial industry worked.

We were fixated on selling stuff but never seemed to question how our behavior, and the behavior of our clients, affected the process.

I became a student of behavioral economics. I read everything I could find on the subject.

I built upon my earlier undergraduate and graduate work in the areas of human performance and traditional economics and begain to formulate a new way of doing business. It was obvious to me that we needed to stop worrying about products and services and start worrying about relationships.

In 2009, I decided it was time for a change. Myself and two partners left Waddell & Reed and formed Apexx Behavioral Financial Group. Our goal was to create a firm founded on the tenants of behavioral finance and behavioral economics.

Business as usual just wasn't working. And I needed to do something about it.

I did my research, developed tools, and wrote “Money Makes Me Crazy, A Prescription for Money Sanity." This was the path to where I am today.

The book lead to the formation of Apexx Behavioral Solutions Group, iPlan, The Apexx General Agency, and other projects - to include moving from a traditional "brick and mortar" model to digital.​

​Over the years, I’ve maintained my interest in endurance sports – marathons and triathlons. This is where I clear my head and dream. In fact, I wrote much of my book while training for Ironman Florida 140.6.

The best part of this ridiculous sport is competing with my Nashville daughter at various venues around the country. 

If you "Get It,"​ let's time to get more...


Ted McLyman


Disclaimer:

The opinions expressed here are my own and do not necessarily represent those of Apexx Behavioral Solutions Group or Apexx Behavioral Financial Group. The information I provide is on an as-is a basis. I make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, correctness, suitability, or validity of any of the information on this blog and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its use.​